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Signs a Child May Need Vision Therapy

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Children are often not aware that they are experiencing vision challenges since they don’t have a point of reference for optimal functional vision. This makes regular comprehensive eye exams important for children as they approach and advance through classroom learning.

Misdiagnosis of visual challenges is also common, and these visual issues can look similar to the following ADHD symptoms:

  • Reading issues
  • Poor attention span in school
  • Frequent mistakes
  • Difficulty doing and completing schoolwork

The best way to determine if these academic challenges are due to visual issues is to see an optometrist who will assess how well the child’s eyes work together. Additionally, some individuals who have ADHD also have vision issues that can compound the ADHD symptoms when not addressed. This makes seeing an eye doctor important to fully understand if vision therapy can assist in alleviating some of the symptoms.

Symptoms that may indicate a need for vision therapy:

  • Skips words or lines when reading
  • Rubs eyes when reading or doing near work
  • Closes one eye with reading or near work
  • Holds reading material close to face or tilts head or paper
  • Sits close to the TV
  • Headaches from reading or homework
  • Good word reader, but poor reading comprehension
  • Poor handwriting
  • Blurred vision when transitioning from far to near vision
  • Homework takes a long time or is highly frustrating
  • Short attention span for schoolwork or reading

Colorado’s doctors of optometry recommend a comprehensive eye exam if a child is experiencing one or more of these symptoms. Early identification and intervention are key in preventing impact on school performance and student confidence. Vision therapy can also help avoid or improve outcomes of surgical intervention. If you think your child may need vision therapy, call us today!

2020Colorado

 

 

 

 

 

2020 Eyes Colorado

iheartVT Virtual Conference

Top Five Vision Therapy Tools

Understand how to utilize traditional therapy procedures and when to move forward with modern alternatives. 1 hour – English – ODs, VTs, Optometry students

Course Handout Top Five Vision Therapy Tools iHeartVT 2020

Products from this course:

  1. Virtual Reality
  2. MFBF Game
  3. Stereoscope
  4. Vectograms
  5. Facility Rock

Virtual Reality Platforms

Vivid Vision: https://www.seevividly.com/

Optics Trainer VR: https://www.opticstrainer.com/

Monocular Fixation in a Binocular Field (MFBF)

MFBF Game: https://www.bernell.com/product/MFBFMG/398

Sherman Cards: https://www.bernell.com/product/KEY4102/Games

Carl’s Cards: https://www.bernell.com/product/RGCC/398

Franzblau Cards: https://www.bernell.com/product/FZKIT/398

Franzblau Anaglyph Rock

*Lens flipper set: Optego (Canada)

https://optego.com/product/home-therapy-flipper-set/

Home Therapy Flipper Set (each flipper sold individually)

Flipper A +0.75/-1.50 -2.50/+1.25

Flipper B +1.75/-3.50 -4.00/+2.00

Flipper C +2.25/-4.50 -5.00/+2.50

Stereoscopes

Bernell-o-scope: https://www.bernell.com/product/BC200/Cheiroscopes

Cheiroscope:

https://www.bernell.com/product/BACT/Cheiroscopes

iPad Stereoscope:

https://www.good-lite.com/gLab Stereoscope

Headline Stereoscope Cards:

https://www.bernell.com/product/HDSC/Stereoscopic_Cards

Vectograms

Vectograms and Vectographs (Polarized glasses):

https://www.bernell.com/category/Vectograms-Vectographs

Vectographs produced by Vision Assessment Corporation (note – these manuals are great and indicate the stereopsis demand of each 3-D target)

https://www.visionassessment.com/polarized-variable-vectographs

Anaglyphs (Colored Glasses)

Red/Green Emergent VT Anaglyphs:

https://www.emergentvt.com/remote-vision-therapy-kit

Tranaglyphs:

https://www.bernell.com/category/Tranaglyphs

Red/Cyan Opto iPad app: http://gerull-labs.com/red-cyan

Red/Blue Home Therapy System (HTS): https://visiontherapysolutions.net/hts-inet/

Red/Blue Vision Builder: http://www.visionbuilder.no/

Facility Rock

Facility Rock Test Set: https://www.good-lite.com/Details.cfm?ProdID=940&category=0&Secondary=0

Flipper Sets from Good-Lite: https://www.good-lite.com/flippers.pdf

Prism Flippers: https://www.bernell.com/category/Prism_Flippers

**If you have similar products in other countries and you would like me to add links, just send the information to drjsimonson@yahoo.com. Thanks!

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2019 Colorado Vision Training Conference (CVTC)

Title: A New Neurofunctional Approach to the Treatment of Amblyopia and Strabismus

Registration Link: https://www.regonline.com/registration/checkin.aspx?eventId=2563295

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Dr. Bob Sanet

This 2-day course will provide attendees with an understanding of amblyopia and strabismus including eccentric fixation and anomalous correspondence and effective evaluation techniques to determine the prognosis in amblyopia, exotropia and esotropia. The course will provide an overview of myths and misconceptions regarding amblyopia and strabismus and review scientific studies on the underlying cause of amblyopia and strabismus and treatment options including patching, surgery and optometric vision therapy. This course will conclude with easy-to-follow, sequential and effective vision therapy treatment procedures for amblyopia, exotropia, and esotropia.

Dates: October 11-13, 2019

Location: Barclay Lodge, YMCA of the Rockies, Estes Park, Colorado

 

 

This event is held next to Rocky Mountain National Park. The closest airport is Denver International Airport. I recommend renting a car for the 2 hr(ish) drive. Fastest route takes the E-470 Toll Road. If you have more time, take Pena to 36 and visit Pearl Street in Boulder, CO for lunch on your way up. There are also several restaurants in the City of Estes Park, Colorado. Even more time? visit the National Park for a hike or scenic drive. Our event starts with dinner at 5 pm at the Barclay lodge. YMCA of the Rockies

50th Annual Colorado Vision Training Conference

 

Bob Pub photo

ROBERT B. SANET, O.D., F.C.O.V.D.

Dr. Robert B. Sanet graduated with honors from the Southern California College of Optometry. He has served as President of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development, Chair of the A.O.A. Sports Vision Section, Board of Directors of the Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association, International Clinical Director of the Special Olympics Opening Eyes Program, Staff Optometrist San Diego Rehabilitation Institute at Alvarado Hospital, Consultant to the Centro de Optometria International in Madrid, Consultant to the Domus Nova Hospital in Ravenna and Adjunct Associate Professor at the Southern California College of Optometry.

Dr. Sanet has worked with amateur and professional athletes including the USA Men’s and Women’s Olympic Volleyball teams, San Diego Chargers, San Diego Padres, and LPGA Golf Professionals.

Dr. Sanet is the developer of the Sanet Vision Integrator, an automated state of the art touch-screen biofeedback Vision Therapy instrument that is beneficial for the rehabilitation of numerous types of visual problem and the enhancement of visual performance.

Dr. Sanet’s numerous awards include the San Diego County Optometrist of the Year, COVD G.N. German Award for Excellence in Children’s Vision Care, NORA Founders Award, COVD President’s Award, OEP Ralph Barstow International Award, Guiseppe Rico Award (Italy) for Excellence in Clinical Practice, International Optometrist of the Year- SIODEC (Spain), International Optometrist of the Year (Mexico), the OEP Armand Bastein International Award (OEP). Dr. Sanet was named as a Distinguished Practitioner in the multidisciplinary National Academies of Practice. He is one of only 100 Optometrists in the USA to have received this award.

Sanet2019

 

Registration Link

Special event in 2019: Learn about the vision of Birds of Prey with Dr. Jennifer Redmond

http://www.birds-of-prey.org/

A room in the Barclay Reunion lodge or the Wind River Lodge (through the registration site) is $300 for the weekend (either 2 double beds or a double bed and bunk bed set). You can also make your own arrangements off-site if you prefer to stay in a hotel instead of a rustic lodge. Catered meals & entertainment plan is $100 for the weekend per person. Registration: Vision therapist $325, Optometrist is $395. Lecture will be in the Wind River lodge this year. Meals and entertainment will be in the Barclay lodge (our normal cabin).

Stereopsis Course for the Oregon Study Group

The Oregon COVD Study Group

presents:

017 BVVT round1

See in 3D: Stereopsis

Everything you need to know about sensory and motor FUSION

by

Jen Simonson, OD, FCOVD

Boulder Valley Vision Therapy

Registration form: Oregon-study-group-invite

Location: The Hampton Inn, 730 SW Columbia Street, Bend, OR 97702. Phone (541) 385-5045.

Lecture Schedule:

Friday August 9th 1pm-5pm
Saturday August 10th 8am-noon, 1 pm-5 pm
Sunday August 11th 8am – 10 am, 10 am – noon Vivid Vision Training

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Vision training research: Strabismus

Thank you Dr. Derron Lee for sharing this research list about strabismus (Crossed, turned, or wandering eyes):

  1. Altizer LB. The non-surgical treatment of exotropia. Am OrthoptJ 1972;22:71-6.
  2. Bair DR. Symposium: Intermittent exotropia, diagnosis and incidence. Am Orthoptic J 1952;2:12-17.
  3. Birnbaum MH. Gross motor control and postural characteristics of strabismic patients. J Am Optom Assoc 1974;45:686-96.
  4. Blakemore C, Van Sluyters RC. Experimental analysis of amblyopia and strabismus. Br J Ophthalmol 1974;58:176-182.
  5. Caloroso EE. A sequential strategy for achieving functional binocularity in strabismus. J Am Optom Assoc 1998;59:378-87.
  6. Caloroso EE, Rouse MW. Clinical management of strabismus. Boston: Butterworth-Heinemann, 1993.
  7. Chryssanthou G. Orthoptic management of intermittent exotropia. Am OrthoptJ 1974;24:69-72.
  8. Coffey B, Wick B, Cotter S, et al. Treatment options in intermittent exotropia: A critical appraisal. Optom Vis Sci 1992; 69(5):386-404.
  9. Colorado Vision Consultants. Manual of esotropia therapy. Boulder: Colorado Vision Consultants, 1985.
  10. Cooper EL, Leyman IA. The management of intermittent exotropia: A comparison of the results of surgical and non-surgical treatment. Am Orthoptic J 1977;27:61-67.
  11. Cooper J. Intermittent exotropia of the divergence excess type. J Am Optom Assoc 1977;48:1261-1273.
  12. Cooper J, Medow N. Major Review: Intermittent exotropia: Basic and divergence excess type. Bin Vis Eye Muscle Surg 1993;8(3):185-216.
  13. Crone RA. Diplopia. New York: American Elsevier Publishing, 1973.
  14. Ciufredda KJ, Kenyon RV, Stark L. Saccadic intrusions in strabismus. Arch Ophthalmol 1979;97:1673-9.
  15. Dale RT. Fundamentals of ocular motility and strabismus. New York: Grune & Stratton, 1982.
  16. Daum KM. Equal exodeviations: Characteristics and results of treatment with orthoptics. Aust J Optom 1984; 67(2):53-9.
  17. Day SH, Norcia AM. Infantile esotropia and the developing visual system. In: Greenwald MJ, eds. Pediatric ophthalmology clinics of North America. Philadelphia: WE Saunders, 1990;3:281-7.
  18. Duke-Elder S, Wybar K. Ocular motility and strabismus. In: Duke-Elder S, ed. System of ophthalmology. Vol. 6. St. Louis: Mosby, 1973.
  19. Etting G. Strabismus therapy in private practice: Cure rates after three months of therapy. J Am Optom Assoc 1978; 49:1367-73.
  20. Flax N. The optometric treatment of intermittent divergent strabismus. Proceedings from the Eastern Seaboard V.T. Conference, Washington, DC, 1963, pp. 52-57.
  21. Flax N, Duckman RH. Orthoptic treatment of strabismus. J Am Optom Assoc 1978;49:1353-61.
  22. Flax N. Strabismus diagnosis and prognosis. In: Schor C, Ciuffreda KF, eds. Vergence eye movements: basic and clinical aspects. Boston: Butrerworths, 1983:579-95.
  23. Fletcher CF, Silverman SJ. Strabismus. Part I. A summary of 1110 consecutive cases. Am J Ophthalmol 1966;61:86-94.
  24. Flom MC. Issues in the clinical management of binocular anomalies. In: Rosenbloom AA, Morgan, MW; eds. Principles and practice of pediatric optometry. Philadelphia: JB Lippincott, 1990.
  25. Flom MC. Treatment of binocular anomalies of vision. In: Hirsch MJ, Wick RE, eds. Vision of children. Philadelphia: Clinton, 1963:197-228.
  26. Flynn JT. Strabismus: A neurodevelopmental approach: Nature’s experiment. New York: Springer-Verlag, 1991.
  27. Forrest EB. Treating infant esotropia: A case report. Am J Optom Physiol Opt 1978;55 :463-465.
  28. Frantz KA. The importance of multiple treatment modalities in a case of divergence excess. J Am Optom Assoc 1990; 61(6):457-62.
  29. Garriott RS, Heyman CL, Rouse MW. Case Report: Role of optometric vision therapy for surgically treated strabismus patients. Optom Vis Sci 1997; 74(4):179-84.
  30. Getz DJ. Strabismus and amblyopia. 2nd ed. Santa Ana, California: Optometric Extension Program, 1990.
  31. Gillan RU. An analysis of one hundred cases of strabismus treated orthoptically. Br J Ophthalmol 1945;29:420-8.
  32. Gnibor GP. Practical details in the orthoptic treatment of strabismus. Arch Ophthalmol 1934;12:887-901.
  33. Goldrich SG. Optometric therapy of divergence excess strabismus. AmJ Optom Physiol Opt 1980;57:7-14.
  34. Graham PA. Epidemiology of strabismus. Br J Ophthalmol 1974;58:224-31.
  35. Greenwald I. Effective strabismus therapy. Duncan: Optometric Extension Program, 1979.
  36. Gillie JC, Lindsay J. Orthoptics: a discussion of binocular anomalies. London: The Hatton Press Ltd., 1969.
  37. Griffin JR. Binocular anomalies: procedures for vision therapy. 2nd ed. Chicago: Professional Press, 1982.
  38. Hoffman L, Cohen AH, Feuer G, et al. Effectiveness of optometric therapy for strabismus in a private practice. Am J Optom Arch Am Acad Optom 1970;47:990-5.
  39. Kertesz AE, Kertesz J. Wide-field stimulation in strabismus. AmJ Optom Physiol Opt 1986;63:217-22.
  40. Krumholtz I, FitzGerald DE. Outcome indicators in a strabismic sample treated by vision therapy. J Behav Optom 1999; 10(6):143-6.
  41. Ludlam W. Management of infantile strabismus: research issues and standards of care. J Optom Vis Devel 1993:24:8-14.
  42. Ludlam WM. Orthoptic treatment of strabismus. Am J Optom Arch Am Acad Optom 1961;38:369-88.
  43. Ludlam WM, Kleinman BI. The long range results of orthoptic treatment of strabismus. Am J Optom Arch Am Acad Optom 1965;42:647-84.
  44. McGraw LG. Guiding strabismus therapy. Santa Ana, California: Vision Extension, 1991.
  45. Parks M. Oculomotility and strabismus. In: Duane TD,ed. Clinical ophthalmology. Hagerstown, MD: Harper & Row, 1979:1.
  46. Pickwell D. Binocular vision anomalies. London: Butterworths, 1984.
  47. Pratt-Johnson JA, Tillson G. Management of strabimus and amblyopia: A practical guide. New York: Thieme Medical Publishers, 1994.
  48. Press LJ. Challenging the Adaption. In: Press LJ. Applied Concepts in Vision Therapy. St. Louis: Mosby, 1997.
  49. Press LJ. Topical review: strabismus. J Optom Vis Devel 1991;22:5-20.
  50. Press LJ. Amblyopia and Strabismus. In: Press LJ, Moore BD, eds. Clinical pediatric optometry. Boston: Butterworth-Heinemann, 1993.
  51. Sanfilippo S, Clahane AC. The effectiveness of orthoptics alone in selected cases of exodeviation: the immediate results and several years later. Am OrthoptJ 1970;20:104-17.
  52. Selenow A, Ciuffreda KJ. Vision function recovery during orthoptic therapy in an adult esotropic amblyope. J Am Optom Assoc 1986; 57(2):132-40.
  53. Stark L, Ciuffreda KJ, Grisham D, Kenyon RV, Kiu J, Polse K. Accommodative dysfacility presenting as intermittent exotropia. Ophthal Physiol Opt 1984;4:233-244
  54. Von Noorden GK. Binocular vision and ocular motility: theory and management of strabismus. 4th ed. St. Louis, Mosby, 1990.
  55. Von Noorden GK. A reassessment of infantile esotropia. Am J Ophthalmol 1988;105:1-10.
  56. Von Noorden GK, Helveston EM. Strabismus: a Decision Making Approach. St. Louis: Mosby; 1994.
  57. Wick B. Visual therapy for small angle esotropia. Am J Optom PhysiolOpt 1974;51:490-6.
  58. Wick B et al. Characteristics and prevalence of exotropia in clinic populations. Poster Program, American Academy of Optometry, Nashville, TN 1990.
  59. Ziegler D, Huff D, Rouse MW. Success in strabismus therapy: a literature review. J Am Optom Assoc 1982;53:979-83.

College of Optometrists in Vision Development & Neuro Optometric Rehabilitation Association Issue Joint Recommendation for Optometric Evaluation Following Brain Injury

Brain injury can affect a person in many ways, extending from physical limitations to changes in perception and cognition. In the United States, an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a TBI each year1, with about 75 percent of them a result of concussions or other forms of mild traumatic brain injury2. “Studies show that at least 50 percent of TBI patients suffer from visual dysfunctions, with one such study3 finding a 90 percent incidence of post-trauma visual complications, such as blurred vision, sensitivity to light, reading difficulty, headaches with visual tasks, and difficulties with eye movements,” says NORA president Susan Daniel, O.D. “About two-thirds of stroke survivors have visual impairment that typically relates to diminished central or peripheral vision, eye movement abnormalities, or visual perceptual defects4,” she adds.

“Clinicians regularly assess a concussion or other acquired brain injury to the symptoms that an individual manifests at the time of injury but, unfortunately, vision-related problems are often overlooked during initial evaluation,” says COVD President, Dr. Christine Allison. “Some symptoms, like visual discomfort and vision-mediated functional difficulties such as slowed reading and compromised attention, may not be present until days, weeks, or even longer following the incident. The consequences of these occurrences may also include cognitive problems such as headache, difficulty thinking, memory problems, attention deficits, mood swings and frustration, along with motor and sensory issues leading to impaired academic, work, and sport performance.”

Given the high rate of visual symptoms and known impact, both COVD and NORA urge healthcare professionals to consider the possibility that a patient’s ocular or visual signs or symptoms may have been a result of a brain injury and refer him/her to an optometrist who has special expertise in the assessment and treatment of visual disturbances associated with damage to the central nervous system. “Doctors of Optometry who have been educated and trained to diagnose and manage ocular dysfunctions and visual processing deficits related to brain injuries will examine not only the visual issues, but also other subtle factors involved in the complex visual process, such as posture, spatial awareness, visual memory, and motor output — all areas that can have wide-ranging effects on daily activities and on quality of life,” explains Dr. Allison. “Left untreated, they can have serious consequences,” she warns.

Both COVD and NORA stress the importance of an interdisciplinary, integrated team approach in the diagnosis and rehabilitation of patients with concussions, stroke or other neurological deficits. “When a person has a brain injury, often a single-approach to rehabilitation is not enough to address all of his/her needs,” says Daniel. “An integrated team approach that incorporates the training and expertise of a variety of professionals can play a vital role in rehabilitation.” In addition to optometrists, rehabilitation team members may include such specialists as neurologists, physical medicine and rehab physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, chiropractors, neuropsychologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists.

Both COVD and NORA offer resources to help patients and caregivers find the help they need following a concussion as well as tools and resources for optometrists and other healthcare professionals. Both associations also feature doctor locaters on their websites for access to providers who specialize in brain-injury related visual problems. For more information, visit them at www.covd.org and www.noravisionrehab.org.

References

1. Faul M, Xu L, Wald MM, Coronado VG. Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations and Deaths 2002–2006. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2010.

2. Report to Congress on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Steps to Prevent a Serious Public Health Problem. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2003.

3. Ciuffreda KJ, Kapoor N, Rutner D, Suchoff IB, Han ME, Craig S. Occurrence of oculomotor dysfunctions in acquired brain injury: a retrospective analysis. Optometry 2007;78(4):155-61.

4. Rowe F.J. Stroke survivors’ views and experiences on impact of visual impairment. Brain and Behavior, 2017; e00778 DOI: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/brb3.778

Building Blocks for Vision Development

Building Blocks for Vision Development

http://studtfoundation.org/

Join us Sunday February 24, 2019 at Western University College of Optometry
At this year’s practicum, Dr. Simonson will share some of her most coveted pearls and strategies for young patients with special needs/developmentally delayed and physical handicaps. She will review normal versus delayed visual development from general motor concepts to development of visual perception and motor output for reproduction. You will gain insight into a systematic approach to vision therapy procedures for these young cases.

Registration Form:

http://studtfoundation.org/Studt%20165%20Registration%20Form-.pdf

Additional resources:

Chapters visually guided gross motor

Career Opportunity Meeting

Job Informational Meeting/Initial Interviews

Monday, January 14, 2019 6:30 – 7:30 pm

  • Gain a better understanding about vision development and rehabilitation.
  • Learn about specific job requirements for the position of Vision Therapist

Interested in helping children and adults achieve their best through vision therapy? We are looking for a motivated individual that has a passion for helping others and has an attitude of learning. Training will be provided. The position is 3 afternoons per week and requires availability from 3:30-6:30 pm. Please send your resume and cover letter describing why you would be a perfect fit for our practice. Learn more about the services we offer at www.bouldervt.com.

2018 Eastern States Congress of Optometry

Thank you for your interest in the 2018 Eastern States Congress of Optometry courses taught by Dr. Jen Simonson

2018 Eastern States Optometric Congress
Baby Steps to Vision
October 27-28, 2018
White Plains, New York

Additional resources:

VISION TESTING:

  1. Wach’s Analysis of Cognitive Structures testing kit:
    https://www.bernell.com/product/WACSKIT/Perceptual_Skills
  2. Gesell Copy Forms:
    https://gesellinstitute.org/products/copy-form-cards
  3. Copy Form Test:
    https://www.bernell.com/product/BC11985/Games
  4. NSUCO Oculomotor Test Summary:
    http://drboulet.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/NSUCO-Oculomotor-Test-via-PUCO.pdfGrab-a-Bubble (pack of 12)
  5. Standing Angels Testing:
    Standing Angels

VISION THERAPY RESOURCES:

  1. Brand of bubbles that you can catch and stack: “Grab-a-bubble”
  2. Attribute Blocks:
    1. attribute Blocks
    2. Junior-Learning-Attribute-Block-Activities
  3. Parquetry Blocks: Parquetry Blocks
  4. Emergent red/green glasses and therapy activities: https://emergentvt.com/collections/a-le-carte
  5. Red/Green Toybox http://www.redgreentoybox.com/
  6. Craft Store items:
    1. Black felt (large)
    2. Red felt sheets
    3. Green felt sheets
    4. Pom poms (red/green/white) pom poms
    5. Pipe cleaners (red/green/white) Pipe Cleaners
    6. Wood clothes pins

Please contact Dr. Jen Simonson with any other suggestions and resources to add to this list.