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2016 CCIRA Conference Course #227

Course #227 “Classroom Accommodations for Students with Visual Issues”
2016 Colorado Council International Reading Association meeting in Denver, CO.
Thursday, Feb. 4th – 2:45-4:45

World of Wonder

Course Slides:CCIRA 2016 course 227

Course Notes: 227 Course Handout CCIRA 2016

Checklist: TeacherQuestionnaire

Thank you so much for your questions and participation in this course! I really enjoy helping teachers better understand the issues their students are facing and how to help them succeed in the classroom.

– Dr. Jen Simonson

Jen Simonson, OD, FCOVD

Dr. Jen Simonson at the Boulder Valley Vision Therapy Center

Additional Resources:

www.eyesontrack.com

http://www.amazon.com/Classroom-Activities-Correcting-Specific-Problems/dp/0131362194

WATCH THIS VIDEO: Vision at School: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyWYlbhEKxA

Reading Windows: Http: //readingwindow.org/home/chapter-5-making-reading-windows/

Graph Paper: http://www.printfreegraphpaper.com/

Vertical lines for math problems: http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/printable-lined-paper

Vision in the Classroom: http://oepf.org/product/B118

Educator’s Guide: http://oepf.org/product/B201

Where to refer?

1. The College of Optometrists in Vision Development: http://locate.covd.org/

2. Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association: https://nora.cc/

3. Optometrists Network

References:

  1. Leong D, Master C, Messner L, Pang Y, Smith C, Starling A. The effect of saccadic training on early reading fluency. Clin Pediat 2014;pages 1-7 (May 1, 2014, doi:10.1177/0009922814532520 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24790022
  2. COVD summary of research in vision and learning http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.covd.org/resource/resmgr/Research/10a_SummaryofResearchonVisio.pdf
  3. Association between reading speed, cycloplegic refractive error, and oculomotor function in reading disabled children versus controls. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=quaid%2C+vision%2C+learning

Please let me know if you have any additional questions.

A Comparison of Van Orden Star Drawings

COVD 2015 Poster: Van Orden Training Utilizing the Stereoscope for iPad

BACKGROUND: Millard E. Van Orden developed a stereoscopically drawn visual pattern to gain insight on the patient’s binocular visual behavior pattern. This drawing records the projection in space of corresponding visual areas. When used for training, the patient receives feedback on the reorganization of visual space and stability of eye posture and binocular vision.

PROCEDURES: Van Orden drawings were completed with the Translucent Correct-eye-scope set at 0-0 and the Stereoscope for iPad set at 0 (optical far-point). The optics of the prismatic lens allow for a distance accommodative and vergence demand, but a physical distance of 20 centimeters. Targets included binocular vision space testing, far point – peripheral control, base-in projection stereo training, and base-out projection stereo training. Instructions were the same for both the traditional and digital drawings and followed the Van Orden Technique of Visual Rehabilitation Instruction Manual (Keystone View Company, www.keystoneview.com/download_manuals/6104_van_orden.pdf)

 

Van Orden Star

Dr. Simonson presented a poster at the 2015 COVD Annual meeting.

INNOVATIVE CHARACTERISTICS:

1. Ability to complete testing and training in more postures with the same device (standing or sitting, primary gaze or up/down gaze)

2. Ability to add images to electronic health records for performance documentation.

3. Ability to test visual performance when viewing a digital device (clinically noted to cause more visual complaints).

Link to more information: Van Orden Tracing on the Stereoscope for iPad and OPTO App

Picture2

Picture1

Thank you for submitting your abstract, ” Van Orden Training Utilizing the Stereoscope for iPad”, to the 2015 COVD annual meeting. The review process has concluded, and we are pleased to inform you that your abstract was accepted, to be presented as a poster. It is scheduled to be displayed on Thursday, April 16 and Friday April, 17 2015 on poster board #29.

Clinical Pearls for Treating Vertical Deviations

I really enjoyed the opportunity to speak during the general education program of the 2014 College of Optometrists in Vision Development Annual Meeting. Part of the reason I wanted to do this is because presenting to a group lets me research and organize my thoughts on a particular topic. In this case, it was treating vertical strabismus with vision therapy. I hope this information is helpful to you in clinical practice! – Dr. Simonson

COVD3

Course handout

Link to more information from the course “Clinical Pearls for Treating Vertical Deviations

Locate Us

We are located in Boulder, Colorado on the southeast corner of 28th Street (Highway 36) and Valmont Road. Our parking lot can be accessed by heading eastbound on Valmont Road. We are just north of the Walgreens. Look for our giant blue logo sign on the corner.

Please complete the history form and submit before your appointment. If you prefer to print forms and bring them with you, please click here.

Boulder Valley Vision Therapy

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IMG 3891

*New pictures coming soon*

Contact Details
Address
2800 Valmont Road
Boulder, CO 80301
Directions

Take Highway 36 to Boulder where it turns into 28th Street.  Turn east onto Valmont Road. Our parking lot is an immediate right.

 

Emergencies

Emergency:

In case of an eye health emergency or injury, please contact your primary care optometrist.

Hours
  • 10:00 AM - 6:15 PM
  • 10:00 AM - 6:15 PM
  • 10:00 AM - 6:15 PM
  • 10:00 AM - 6:15 PM
  • Closed
  • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
  • Closed

Notes:

Please contact us with any questions you might have at bouldervt@yahoo.com.

Payment Information

We Accept:

  • visa
  • mastercard
  • discover
  • cash
  • check
  • americanexpress
  • debit

Notes:

We accept credit cards, checks and cash. We do not bill insurance, but will assist you in the process of seeking reimbursement.

Developing Children's Vision and Enhancing Adult Performance

Vision Therapy is used to treat:

  • Eye Focusing
  • Eye Tracking
  • Eye-Hand Coordination
  • Sports Vision
  • Computer-Related Vision Problems
  • Crossed or Wandering Eyes
  • Amblyopia (lazy eye)
  • Depth Perception
  • Visual Sensory Integration
  • Vision Processing relating to Reading and Learning Problems

Do you experience tired eyes, difficulty focusing, blurred vision, double vision or eye strain?

Our vision therapy center is devoted to developing, improving, and enhancing visual skills including focusing, tracking, eye alignment and coordination.

Please register on-line through our secure system so that the doctor can review your information prior to your appointment. If you prefer, you can also print out online forms to bring with you – click here to print forms.

preschool vision therapy

Insurance & Financing

Will insurance cover this type of treatment?

Visual perceptual therapy for learning issues or educational problems is not covered under health plans. Some health insurance plans may cover a portion of the evaluation and treatment if there is a specific eye muscle problem. We do not bill insurance, but will assist you in the process of seeking reimbursement.

Vision Therapy Q&A With Our Doctors

What is Vision Therapy?

Vision therapy is an individualized treatment plan prescribed by a Doctor of Optometry. It is used to treat eye conditions, such as strabismus (eye turn) or amblyopia (“lazy eye”). Through Vision Therapy, a Doctor of Optometry also teaches, improves and/or reinforces important visual skills, such as eye tracking, eye focusing and eye teaming abilities. Without these visual skills, simple tasks like reading or copying notes from the board become difficult. Skipping words or lines while reading, using a finger while reading, blurry near vision, double vision, eyestrain and/or eye fatigue are also common symptoms.

How do I know Vision Therapy is right for my child?

If your child displays symptoms of strabismus (eye turn), amblyopia (“lazy eye”), skipping words or lines while reading, using a finger while reading, blurry near vision, double vision, eyestrain and/or eye fatigue, it is suggested your child has a complete eye exam from a Doctor of Optometry. If symptoms persist or the Doctor of Optometry recommends Vision Therapy, then a Vision Therapy assessment is the next step. The doctor will perform a thorough one-on-one assessment and will determine which conditions are present, whether Vision Therapy is suitable, the type of eye exercises required and the number of sessions needed.

JenSimonson1-640x640

Dr. Jennifer Simonson

What Our Patients Have to Say....

Emergencies+

Please call your primary care optometrist or 911 for eye emergencies. You may also contact our office at: 303-443-2257 for further instructions during business hours.

  • 10:00 AM - 6:15 PM
  • 10:00 AM - 6:15 PM
  • 10:00 AM - 6:15 PM
  • 10:00 AM - 6:15 PM
  • Closed
  • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
  • Closed

Notes:

Please contact us with any questions you might have at bouldervt@yahoo.com.

What's New? | Our Blog

Protected: Building Blocks Course Handouts

This page is for registered course participants. A password is required to access Building Blocks: Vision Therapy for Young Children Course Handouts

Building Blocks: Vision Therapy for Young Children

Registration:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/149068874015

Summary:

Learn about age-appropriate vision therapy procedures for preschool-aged patients from 3-6 years old. Discover procedures to build tracking, focusing, and binocular skills. Train on visually-guided gross motor coordination, fine motor skills, and visual information processing appropriate to the patient's age and development. This course will cover optometric vision therapy for amblyopia and strabismus to decrease suppression and improve eye alignment and sensory fusion. Learn how to modify therapy techniques for young children and how to successfully sequence vision training.